Welcome to the July Product Rundown! Here you’ll find the latest updates and tech improvements we’ve been working on right here at LeasePlan. If you’d like to know more about any of the products or services you see here, feel free to reach out to your account manager to get started today.

How well are you communicating with your drivers?

Let’s face it – sometimes communicating with all of your drivers can be a challenge. Chances are, if you feel like you could be doing more, you probably can. Did you know there is more than one way to communicate with your fleet using LeasePlan services? Opt into any one at any time. Reach out to your account manager for more information.

MyLeasePlan

Let’s start with the MyLeasePlan app. It already offers personal mileage reporting, vehicle maintenance records and a fuel locator – and there’s so much more coming. You can even allow your drivers to accept your company policy and help enforce compliance through the app.

Elle

Enrolling in Elle is a great way to let your drivers do the talking – especially when it comes to the simple things. While drivers would once dial up their fleet managers to ask day-to-day questions, all of those inquiries can now be directed toward Elle first. If she can’t answer it, she’ll learn how. She even absorbs your policy information, making it a one-stop shop for any policy-related questions your drivers may have while on the road. Think of Elle as a fleet manager’s first line of support – she’s not just the driver’s virtual assistant, she’s everybody’s virtual assistant.

OneScore

Tell your drivers how they’re doing, incentivize them, show them where they can improve – all without lifting a finger. Not only does OneScore do all this and more for your drivers, the aggregate data allows you to see your driver performance from a bird’s eye view. So you can better spot the areas that need the most attention to proactively manage your fleet.

To learn more about how to enhance your driver communications setup, reach out to your account manager today.

You, too, can help teach Elle

When you communicate with Elle, she learns and communicates back. She’s able to ingest policy data, fuel card information and more, just to make life a bit easier for you and your drivers. The only way she gets better, though, is by doing more. So, talk to Elle! More talking means more listening – which means more talking (and problem solving!) for fleet’s first virtual assistant.

Go ahead, put her to the test! You can start with things like:

  • What is my fuel card pin?
  • Can my spouse drive my car?
  • Will my company pay for my car wash?

Click here to check out Elle’s full capabilities.

Tech Alpharetta, the nonprofit organization helping the City of Alpharetta lead in innovation, announces three new members of its Strategic Board of Directors. Tech Alpharetta’s Board, which focuses on ideating and implementing strategies for growing the Alpharetta tech community, is comprised of a veritable who’s who of some of the area’s leading, senior technology executives.

The 35-person Board features local c-suite and senior executives, along with community partners – ATDC, Technology Association of Georgia (TAG), Gwinnett Technical College, the Metro Atlanta Chamber of Commerce and the Greater North Fulton Chamber of Commerce (GNFCC). Tech Alpharetta’s newest Board members include:

  • Cindy Jordan-Ford, VP & General Manager, USLATAM, Cogeco Peer 1
  • Felipe Smolka, EVP of Transformation, LeasePlan USA
  • James McAnally, VP, Adaptive Management Services, Pointnext, HPE

“Tech Alpharetta continues to selectively grow its Board through the addition of these three impressive innovators,” says Karen Cashion, CEO of Tech Alpharetta. “We’re excited and humbled by their willingness to join us in helping to advance Tech Alpharetta’s mission of growing technology and innovation in the city of Alpharetta.”

 Since its establishment in 2012, Tech Alpharetta and its Board have advised the city of Alpharetta on tech infrastructure and ecosystem. The Board’s recommendations led to the launch of Tech Alpharetta’s Innovation Center, the creation of the city’s economic development website www.growalpharetta.com, and other notable developments.

For more information about Tech Alpharetta, its mission and it programs, or for information about the Tech Alpharetta Innovation Center, visit www.techalpharetta.com.

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When the new pickups came in, Tom Collom found they were being drop-shipped to dealers that were 60 to 80 miles away from the office and his drivers. The agreement with a new dealer group saved the company $100 on PDI (pre-delivery inspection) fees for each truck, he was told by senior management.

Collom, a shop supervisor in West Texas for a major oil and gas producer, pointed out that the company was losing double that by having to pay drivers for an extra half day of travel just to get the trucks. The senior manager’s response? “His exact words to me were, ‘I’m showing on paper that I’m saving money,’” Collom says.

In recent years, Collom has seen a shift in the positions at his company that oversee fleet. And the way he sees it, this new blood hasn’t driven a net savings of time or money for the vehicles he manages.

“We’ve got a bunch people now that are trying to run (fleet) like bank managers and accountants,” he says. “What takes years to get the efficiency and productivity incorporated into your shop and your fleet can be totally destroyed by people who haven’t actually worked on vehicles.”

Collom used to have a good working relationship with management when it came to fleet, he says. They may not have been mechanics, but they knew enough about what was happening on the ground and under the hood to talk the same language. That’s not so true anymore.

Marc Canton, a consultant for Mercury Associates, agrees. He’s seen instances in which fleet managers with no automotive background were taken to the cleaners by repair service providers and even their own techs.

Canton recalls an instance in which a single repair was paid for three times with different invoice numbers and slightly different terminology. Other times a fleet manager didn’t have the wherewithal to sniff out an unneeded upsell or challenge a repair cost or delay. (One was told that the parts for an airbrake on an F-150 take a long time to come in.)

Read the rest of this article by Fleet Forward here.

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The number of crashes at two-lane roundabouts decreased on average 9% per year of their existence in the roadway, according to a new study conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

In another finding, the odds that a collision at a two-lane roundabout involved an evident or incapacitating injury decreased by nearly one-third annually.

Failing to yield the right-of-way is a common problem at roundabouts in general. However, the study showed that the odds that a crash at a two-lane roundabout involved that type of error dropped 11% annually.

These latest findings indicate that as drivers get familiar with two-lane roundabouts, safety tends to increase.

Conducted in Washington state, which features more than 300 roundabouts, the study involved 98 single-lane and 29 two-lane roundabouts built between 2009 and 2015.

For each roundabout, IIHS looked at crashes beginning with the first full calendar year after completion and ending with 2016. Clearly, older roundabouts had more years of data. To account for the effects of the economy and traffic volumes on crashes, the analysis included the unemployment rate and annual vehicle miles traveled in the area where each roundabout was located.

The longest period analyzed for any of the roundabouts was seven years.

While the safety findings for two-lane roundabouts, which are often considered challenging to navigate, were encouraging. The single-lane roundabout findings were less significant.

The number of crashes increased an average of 7% at single-lane roundabouts, and the odds of an injury fell 19% annually, but those changes weren't statistically significant, according to IIHS. It is not clear how long the crash reductions would be expected to continue.

 

Source: Automotive Fleet

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We are delighted to announce that Carolyn Edwards, senior vice-president, client success, has been nominated for Automotive Fleet’s Hall of Fame 2019.

Edwards has spent her 28 years in fleet with LeasePlan USA. In that time, she has served as director of strategic accounts for client services; director of operations for vehicle acquisition; VP of manufacturer relations and business solutions for client relations; and now serves as SVP, client success. In 2012 she helped found the Women in Fleet Management (WIFM)Task Force, an avenue to provide women in fleet leadership with resources and opportunities for personal and career development.

Honorees inducted into the Hall of Fame will be announced at the 2019 AFLA conference which will be held at the Arizona Grand Resort & Spa this year on September 16-18. Inductions into the Hall of Fame happen once a year. Entering the Hall of Fame recognizes industry leaders and pioneers who have contributed significantly to the commercial fleet management profession.

Inductees are selected by their peers through an online ballot. This ballot will be available on Automotive-Fleet.com in July, check back here for a link to vote.

 

 

 

Source: Automotive Fleet

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