The national average gasoline price fell 2 cents to $2.71 per gallon, as demand saw a “small dip” during the week ending Aug. 5, according to AAA.

The average price is now 4 cents lower than a month ago and 15 cents cheaper than a year ago. Overall summer demand remains robust, said Jeanette Casselano, AAA spokesperson.

“While gas prices continue to drop, the rate at which they are decreasing has slowed,” Casselano said. “On the week, most states saw cheaper pump prices of only a few pennies and motorists can expect this trend to continue into early August.”

Motorists can find gasoline for $2.75 or less at 65% of the stations across the country.

States with the largest monthly decreases include Florida (17 cents), Alaska. (17 cents), Michigan (14 cents), Illinois (13 cents), Delaware (12 cents), California (10 cents), Kentucky (9 cents), Arizona (9 cents), Colorado (9 cents), and Idaho (9 cents).

States with the least expensive markets include Louisiana ($2.33), Mississippi ($2.33), Alabama ($2.35), Arkansas ($2.37), South Carolina ($2.37), Oklahoma ($2.41), Tennessee ($2.43), Texas ($2.44), Missouri ($2.45), and Kansas ($2.46).

Meanwhile, the average price for a gallon of diesel fell two-tenths of a cent to $3.032, which is 19.1 cents lower than a year ago, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Source: Automotive Fleet

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When the new pickups came in, Tom Collom found they were being drop-shipped to dealers that were 60 to 80 miles away from the office and his drivers. The agreement with a new dealer group saved the company $100 on PDI (pre-delivery inspection) fees for each truck, he was told by senior management.

Collom, a shop supervisor in West Texas for a major oil and gas producer, pointed out that the company was losing double that by having to pay drivers for an extra half day of travel just to get the trucks. The senior manager’s response? “His exact words to me were, ‘I’m showing on paper that I’m saving money,’” Collom says.

In recent years, Collom has seen a shift in the positions at his company that oversee fleet. And the way he sees it, this new blood hasn’t driven a net savings of time or money for the vehicles he manages.

“We’ve got a bunch people now that are trying to run (fleet) like bank managers and accountants,” he says. “What takes years to get the efficiency and productivity incorporated into your shop and your fleet can be totally destroyed by people who haven’t actually worked on vehicles.”

Collom used to have a good working relationship with management when it came to fleet, he says. They may not have been mechanics, but they knew enough about what was happening on the ground and under the hood to talk the same language. That’s not so true anymore.

Marc Canton, a consultant for Mercury Associates, agrees. He’s seen instances in which fleet managers with no automotive background were taken to the cleaners by repair service providers and even their own techs.

Canton recalls an instance in which a single repair was paid for three times with different invoice numbers and slightly different terminology. Other times a fleet manager didn’t have the wherewithal to sniff out an unneeded upsell or challenge a repair cost or delay. (One was told that the parts for an airbrake on an F-150 take a long time to come in.)

Read the rest of this article by Fleet Forward here.

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The number of crashes at two-lane roundabouts decreased on average 9% per year of their existence in the roadway, according to a new study conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

In another finding, the odds that a collision at a two-lane roundabout involved an evident or incapacitating injury decreased by nearly one-third annually.

Failing to yield the right-of-way is a common problem at roundabouts in general. However, the study showed that the odds that a crash at a two-lane roundabout involved that type of error dropped 11% annually.

These latest findings indicate that as drivers get familiar with two-lane roundabouts, safety tends to increase.

Conducted in Washington state, which features more than 300 roundabouts, the study involved 98 single-lane and 29 two-lane roundabouts built between 2009 and 2015.

For each roundabout, IIHS looked at crashes beginning with the first full calendar year after completion and ending with 2016. Clearly, older roundabouts had more years of data. To account for the effects of the economy and traffic volumes on crashes, the analysis included the unemployment rate and annual vehicle miles traveled in the area where each roundabout was located.

The longest period analyzed for any of the roundabouts was seven years.

While the safety findings for two-lane roundabouts, which are often considered challenging to navigate, were encouraging. The single-lane roundabout findings were less significant.

The number of crashes increased an average of 7% at single-lane roundabouts, and the odds of an injury fell 19% annually, but those changes weren't statistically significant, according to IIHS. It is not clear how long the crash reductions would be expected to continue.

 

Source: Automotive Fleet

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Geotab ranked number one Commercial Telematics vendor worldwide by ABI Research
Company edges out Verizon and Trimble in innovation and implementation

Geotab, a global leader in IoT and connected transportation, is pleased to announce it has been named the top commercial telematics provider worldwide by ABI Research. Providing strategic guidance on the most compelling transformative technologies, ABI, a market-foresight advisory firm, placed Geotab first in both innovation and implementation, with an overall score of 82.3.

Through its Competitive Assessment (CA), ABI conducted unbiased research, ranking commercial telematics providers in two key areas: innovation and implementation. The providers were analyzed based on a series of criteria including: open platforms, tech development, user interface and experience, market share, geographic coverage, vertical segments, partnerships, financial strength and solution options.

Receiving top recognition in both innovation and implementation, ABI Research identified Geotab's massive market share growth, extensive partnership model and Marketplace, open platform approach and focus on technological development as key contributors to the company's ranking.

"We are thrilled to be recognized as the global leader in telematics by ABI Research," said Geotab CEO Neil Cawse. "Considering our world-class competitors, it is truly an honor that demonstrates our commitment to providing fleets with the most advanced connected technologiesincluding for electric vehicles and our ability to contribute significantly to the transformation of the logistics industry."

ABI forecasts global commercial telematics system revenues to rise across trucking segments from US$13.3 billion in 2017 to over US$23 billion in 2022. According to ABI Research principal analyst, Susan Beardslee, the commercial telematics industry will continue to transform rapidly, addressing a marketplace transition from rising OEM factory installs to evolving technologies such as prognostics, video and blockchain. Recognizing Geotab's significant 44% growth of its subscriber base in 2018, ABI predicts that global telematics subscriptions are slated to top 45 million by the end of 2019.

Currently equipping more than 1.7 million vehicles with its telematics technology, Geotab provides data-driven insights to over 40,000 customers worldwide and enables users to customize their solution through a suite of over 150 hardware add-ons, software add-ins and applications available on the Geotab Marketplace. With active devices present in more than 119 countries, Geotab's solutions are sold through its global network of Authorized Geotab Resellers.

"Geotab's reputation and leadership continues to be reflected not only with this recognition from ABI, but in the caliber of recent contracts it has been awarded from both the GSA and the State of California," added Cawse. "It is through our dedicated staff and the commitment of our strong network of partners that Geotab continues to strengthen its presence around the globe and experience unprecedented success year over year."

 

Source: Geotab

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A new partnership between ChargePoint and Electrify America will allow users of each electric-vehicle charging network to use the other network with no additional charges, the operators have announced.
 
The “roaming” agreement, which may help users think about the agreement in a similar way as cellular networks, is expected to help accelerate adoption of plug-in vehicles, because it overcomes a proprietary-network hurdle.
 
“This roaming agreement further accelerates the seamless integration of individual EV fueling networks and brings us even closer to the day when the movement of all goods and people will be powered by electricity,” said Pasquale Romano, ChargePoint’s president and CEO. “Partnerships like this make transitioning to electric drive easier than continuing to use fossil fuels.”

There will be more than 30,000 individual charge points connected by the two networks, including Level 2 AC and DC fast charging (CCS or CHAdeMo). ChargePoint claims to be the largest charging network in the world with 66,000 locations. Electrify America has pledged to have 2,000 charging points at 484 locations in the U.S. by July 1.

ChargePoint has also made an agreement with WEX Inc. to provide seamless charging payments for commercial and government fleets.

 

Source: Automotive Fleet

 

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